International Advocacy for Indigenous Peoples

International Advocacy for Indigenous Peoples

This is a two-credit seminar that will critically examine specific current international law developing and affecting the rights of indigenous peoples. It is intended to look closely at major studies, findings, recommendations, and emerging international law in respect to indigenous peoples, in specific areas including, discrimination, self-determination, and intellectual property and protection of indigenous knowledge. The seminar is intended to examine the major issues in depth and to stimulate discussion regarding the developing law, and its use in advocacy for indigenous peoples in the US. The seminar will also consider issues raised by indigenous peoples at the international level including, repatriation, border issues, universal jurisdiction, and others that arise for indigenous peoples as international law norms affect indigenous communities, such as conflict of human rights norms with tradition. Advocating human rights domestically and use of international law in advocacy by Indian nations within the nation state will be considered. Discussions will focus specifically on international advocacy for indigenous peoples in the US, including the challenges to such advocacy and the impact on indigenous peoples, within the US context. International Law and Indigenous Peoples and/or Federal Indian Law are useful for this course, but not required.