Williams Institute Moot Court

Williams Institute Moot Court

The Sexual Orientation Law Moot Court Competition is the only national competition dedicated exclusively to the area of sexual orientation law. This year’s competition will provide an opportunity for competitors to write an appellate-level brief on a current topic in sexual orientation law and to argue the case before a panel of judges. The competition is designed to promote and recognize the finest oral and written advocacy on a significant problem in sexual orientation law.

Web Site
http://www.law.ucla.edu/Williamsinstitute/home.html

Coach
Professor Steven Homer

Students who are eligible
2L and 3L students only

Dates and timeline overview
Application packets will come out in late November.
During Winter Break teams will draft a brief to the U.S. Supreme Court (NO faculty or coach input is allowed until the brief is turned in).
The brief is due in mid-January. Oral argument practice and coaching will take place four to five nights a week throughout January, until the competition at the end of the month at the UCLA School of Law.

Try out details:  Students will be asked to write a short legal argument based on last year’s problem, as well as a short personal statement explaining their interest in the competition. Students will also be asked to provide their ELA II grade and any other moot court experience/commitments. Students who are interested should email Professor Homer by the third week of October. Selection will begin immediately thereafter.

What to expect
Competitors should expect to dedicate significant time during Winter Break to meet with their teammates and prepare a brief. Self-starters who can complete the research and analysis before classes start in January are especially encouraged to participate.
Teams will meet several evenings a week during January to practice their oral arguments; the time commitment is equivalent to attending an additional class. Participants should be prepared to keep their evening schedules free of conflicts during January.
Because the competition is part of the Williams Institute’s judicial education program, teams will have the opportunity to practice their arguments in front of several members of the bench.
Note that the final round of this competition will take place a month after the preliminary rounds, and funding to attend the final round is not guaranteed.