Professor Carol A. Parker

Contact Information

Ph.: 505-363-3493
Fax: 505-277-1597
Office: 3251

Carol Parker

Professor of Law
Interim Senior Vice Provost (Main Campus)
Associate Dean for Finance (Law School)
American Council on Education Fellow (2012-2013)

B.A., Michigan State University
M.I.S., University of Michigan
J.D., Wayne State University
Member of the Michigan Bar

Curriculum Vitae SSRN

Profile

As the Law School's Associate Dean for Finance, Parker provides oversight and direction for budgeting, accounting and fiscal services for all Law School expenditures and revenue which comes from a variety of sources including state funding formula appropriations, tuition, fees, special appropriations, contracts, state and federal grants, general obligation bonds, Foundation gifts, and fees-for-service. As a member of the law dean's management team she is involved in law school strategic planning, policy setting and problem solving.

In September, 2013, Parker began serving as Associate Provost for Academic Personnel, and in December, 2013, as Interim Senior Vice Provost, in UNM's Office of the Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs.

Prior to her work in the Academic Affairs office, Parker served as the Law School's Associate Dean for Finance and Administration which entailed providing oversight and direction for numerous law school services and operations including budgeting, accounting and financial analysis; human resources; facilities and building safety; law journal business operations; information technology and the law library. In addition she oversaw administrative support for faculty hiring and contracts; and for grants and special appropriations. She has served on various Law School and university-wide ad hoc committees, on Faculty Senate committees, and has served as the Law School's faculty senator.

Parker's higher education administrative experience was enhanced by a year spent as a Fellow of the American Council on Education (2012-2013) in a leadership development program that included an extended placement in the Office of the Executive Vice President and Provost at Arizona State University. As an ACE Fellow Parker examined a wide range of topics relevant to large public universities engaged in very high levels of research; visited the campuses of more than two dozen higher education institutions, foundations,state agencies and non-profits around the country; and worked on special projects for the UNM Office of the President.

Parker has taught Wills and Trusts, Advanced Legal Research, and International Legal Research at UNM Law. She also taught Legal Writing, Research and Advocacy, and Advanced Legal Research as an adjunct professor at Michigan State University College of Law. She is a recipient of UNM Law's Keleher & McLeod Professorship in recognition of her teaching, scholarship and service (2008-2010).

She serves as an accreditation site inspector for the American Bar Association's Section on Legal Education Section of Legal Education and Admissions to the Bar. Parker has received national awards for publications on the subject of open access to legal scholarship and faculty status for academic librarians.

She is licensed to practice law in Michigan and worked as a research attorney at the Michigan Court of Appeals.

Courses

Advanced Legal Research

Advanced Legal Research

The goals of this course are: (1) to teach students to evaluate legal information sources effectively and to formulate a rational research methodology which maximizes efficiency; (2) to expand students skills in using the primary American legal sources (cases, statutes, and administrative regulations and reports) in traditional and electronic formats; (3) to introduce students to specialized American legal sources in subject areas such as labor, securities, and taxation; (4) to hone skills in compiling legislative histories; (5) to familiarize students with the many non-legal information resources and electronic databases and comprehensive news services that are becoming increasingly important to the legal community. Students will have numerous opportunities for "hands on" experiences with a wide range of legal materials and databases.

Required text: The Bluebook: A Uniform System of Citation (current edition)(www.legalbluebook.com)

Legal Research I

Legal Research I

Prerequisite:  LRRW

Outcomes:  Students who take this course will understand governmental structures and where law comes from; court structures and stare decisis; the relationship between statutes, regulations, cases and agencies; where primary law is officially recorded; how to conduct cost effective research using both online and print formats; concepts of Boolean searching; how to locate Federal and New Mexico constitutions, statutes, regulations, case law and court rules; how statutes, regulations and case law digests are organized and hierarchically structured; how court rules are organized and adopted; how to use statutory annotations to locate related regulations and case law; how to find a public law; how to locate and use ALRs, treatises and law reviews; how to locate forms, checklists, jury instructions; how to update and citate statutes, regulations, and case law; how to locate a parallel citation; how to apply the correct citation form for statutes, regulations and case law under the New Mexico Rules of Citation (N. M. Sup. Ct. R. 23-112). 
Methodologies:  Lecture and hands on practice opportunities (in and out of class)
Required textbook:  None
Assessment:  Graded assignments; final project
Required text: The Bluebook: A Uniform System of Citation (current edition)(www.legalbluebook.com)

Legal Research II

Legal Research II

Legal Research II picks up where Legal Research I ends, covering more complex legal research problems and building more in-depth research skills with written assignments and projects, lectures, and labs.

The goals of this course are: (1) to teach students to evaluate legal information sources effectively and to formulate a rational research methodology which maximizes efficiency; (2) to expand students skills in using the primary American legal sources (cases, statutes, and administrative regulations and reports) in print and electronic formats; (3) to introduce students to specialized American legal sources in subject areas possibly including labor, securities, and taxation; (4) to hone skills in compiling legislative histories; (5) to expose students to important international legal materials and Indian law materials (5) and to familiarize students with the many non-legal information resources that are becoming increasingly important to the legal community.

Elective.
2 credits.
Required text: The Bluebook: A Uniform System of Citation (current edition)(www.legalbluebook.com)

Specialized Legal Research (International Law)

Specialized Legal Research (International Law)

This eight-week, one-credit course introduces students to research methods for Public International Law and promotes effective research practices based on knowledge and understanding of the principal organs of the U.N., the International Court of Justice, and the law of treaties. Students will read background essays and analyze print and electronic sources. Students will have numerous opportunities for "hands on" exercises. Grades will be based on weekly homework.
Required text: The Bluebook: A Uniform System of Citation (current edition)(www.legalbluebook.com)

Wills & Trusts

Wills and Trusts

Wills continue to be one of the principal means by which an individual directs the disposition of his or her wealth at death, and trusts and other will substitutes are used increasingly to mange and dispose of property. Nevertheless, many decedents’ assets will pass by operation of law in the absence of a will or will substitutes. This course looks at these means for transferring wealth, which makes it a bread-and-butter course for students who anticipate dealing as lawyers with probate and estate planning issues.

Wills and Trusts explores the ways by which an individual’s property passes at death; how individuals may affect that passage by creating a will or will substitute like a trust during lifetime; what the law requires for a will or will substitute to be enforceable; the extent to which the law may limit the disinheritance of a surviving spouse or child; and how fiduciaries administer estates and trusts.

The course begins with an overview of basic concepts and then proceeds to examine specific topics, including: intestacy, which provides for distribution of property by operation of law when a person fails to leave a valid will; probate estates; nonprobate transfers and will substitutes; the personal representative’s administration of a probate estate; the requirements for executing a valid will; will components; changes of circumstances after execution; revocation; interpretation; will contests; the creation of testamentary and living trusts; the trustee’s administration of a trust estate; the nature of beneficial interests under a trust instrument; rules of survivorship; future interests; the modification and termination of trusts; and powers of appointment. Estate-planning and end-of-life planning basics may be introduced as time permits.

The required textbook for this course is "Fundamentals of Trusts and Estates," 3d ed., by Roger Andersen and Ira Bloom (LexisNexis Publishing, 2007). A TWEN Course Web Site will also be used to access assigned statutes and codes, and a class calendar. This course will be graded on a 100-point scale. Students can earn points by satisfactorily drafting a will and completing various other take-home assignments during the course of the semester; in-class quizzes; and a closed book, multiple-choice final exam administered at the end of the semester.

Book Chapters and Contributions

Implementing Effective Legal Research Pedagogy in Contemporary U.S. Law Schools: Challenges and Opportunities, in Boulder Statements on Legal Research Education: The Intersection of Intellectual and Practical Skills (William S. Hein & Co., Inc.: Buffalo, NY) (2014).

Academic Libraries: Looking Toward the Future, in Academic Librarianship (contributing editor) (Neal-Shuman Publishers, Inc.: New York City 2010).

The Impact of New Technology on Librarianship, in The Changing Role of Academic Librarianship: Leading Librarians on Teaching Legal Research Skills, Responding to Emerging Technologies, and Adapting to Changing Trends, 111-23 (Inside the Minds Series; Aspatore Books: Boston 2008)

Scholarly Articles

How Law Schools Benefit When Academic Law Librarians Write, Teach and Hold Faculty Status, 30(3) Legal Ref. Serv. Q. 237-53 (2011)
Available at: SSRN

Tenure Advice for Law Librarians and Their Directors, 103:2 L. Libr. J. 199-217 (Spring 2011).
Available at: SSRN

The Need for Faculty Status and Uniform Tenure Requirements for Law Librarians, 103:1 L. Libr. J. 7-38 (Winter 2011) (winner of the "AALL LexisNexis® Call for Papers Open Division Award" for 2010).
Available at: SSRN

Leadership Development Programs for Academic Law Librarians, part of a special issue entitled, “Our Commitment to Building Leaders: Programs for Leadership in Academic and Special Libraries”), 49(8) J. Lib. Admin. 881-85 (2009).
Available at: SSRN

Institutional Repositories and the Principles of Open Access: Changing the Way We Think About Legal Scholarship, 37 New Mexico L. Rev. 431-77 (2007) (recipient of the Outstanding Article Award for 2008 from the Academic Law Libraries Special Interest Section of the American Association of Law Libraries). SSRNbepressDSpace

Note, Should the Michigan Supreme Court Adopt a Non-Majority Vote Rule for Granting Leave to Appeal, 43 Wayne L. Rev. 345-74 (1996).

Other Publications

Legal Education for All (or More Than Just Lawyers), Commentary, The Chronicle of Higher Education, September 9, 2013

The Boulder Statement on Legal Research Education: Signature Pedagogy (co-author) (2010)

The Boulder Statement on Legal Research Education (co-author) (2009),.
Available at: http://www.colorado.edu/law/events/legalResearchEducation.pdf

A Few Remodeling Projects Make Major Impact: The University of New Mexico School of Law Library's new reading room, reference desk, and classroom reflect the library as a vibrant activity hub (8th Annual Architectural Series), AALL Spectrum, 20-21 (May 2008).

Legal Resources on the Internet (Part I), 82:5 Mich. B. J. 40-41 (2003).

Legal Resources on the Internet (Part II), 82:6 Mich. B. J. 44-46 (2003).

Digest of Michigan Probate Opinions, 22: 4 Mich. Prob. & Est. Plan. J. 71-79 (Summer 2003).

Digest of Michigan Probate Opinions, 22: 2 Mich. Prob. & Est. Plan. J. 27-35 (Winter 2002).