Volume 2: 2001/2002

Editor-in-Chief

Christine Zuni Cruz (Isleta/San Juan Pueblo)

Managing Editor

Jason Hauter (Maricopa/Hopi/Pima)

Editorial Working Group

Danielle Her Many Horses (Oglala Lakota), Mark Welliver (Citizen Band Potawatomi)

Web Editors

Randy Ash (Dine'), Charmaine McDarment (Yokuts)

Staff

Lisa Lang (Haida), Ahnawake Carroll (Cherokee), Renee Torres (Isleta Pueblo), Betsy Salcedo, Amy ProppsĀ 

Law School Support

Cyndi Dean (Manager), Janet Roupas (User Support), David Anstine (LAN Manager), Barbara Jacques

Articles

The Status of Traditional Indian Justice

The Status of Traditional Indian Justice in Ecuador by Agustin Grijalva discusses constitutional reforms in Ecuador that recognize traditional Indian law and traditional Indian authorities as collective Indian rights. This article explores the historical background of the constitutional reforms, how these reforms might affect the current Ecuadorian judicial system and some potential problems in administering these reforms.

CP 87 and CP 100: Allotment and Fractionation Within the Citizen Potawatomi Nation

CP 87 and CP 100: Allotment and Fractionation Within the Citizen Potawatomi Nation by Mark Welliver illustrates some of the problematic issues faced today by interest owners of Indian allotment land by using his father's interest in allotment land as a "hypothetical," in the context of the Citizen Band Potawatomi's history and removal to Oklahoma. The article also discusses "solutions that are applicable either by the federal government, the tribes, or the individual interest holders."

Restoring Harmony through Nalyeeh: Can the Navajo Common Law of Torts be Applied in State and Federal Forums?

Restoring Harmony through Nalyeeh: Can the Navajo Common Law of Torts be Applied in State and Federal Forums? by J. R. Mueller demonstrates "that the Navajo Nation has developed and articulated a modern tort law and doctrine of restitution grounded in Navajo tradition and evolved from ancient custom, similar to the Anglo-American notion of common law." This article also explores whether tribal customary law can be applied in state and federal forums in light of a recent federal case Cheromiah v. United States.

Oglala Lakota Nation Profile

Oglala Lakota Nation Profile by Danielle Her Many Horses provides an overview of the Oglala Lakota Nation government. This profile contains information on the Oglala Lakota Nation's traditional governance and its contemporary government.

Pueblo of Laguna Tribal Government Profile

Pueblo of Laguna Tribal Government Profile by Kim Coco Iwamoto, provides readers with an overview of the Pueblo of Laguna Tribal Government. Iwamoto's profile contains information on the Pueblo's traditional law, governance, dispute resolution, and extratribal law.